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Posts tagged ‘Mobile Games’

Now, Nokia HealthRadar Chasing Disease Down Thru Flashlite…….

Nokia  has designed an application in Flashlite for the tracking of disease using mobile devices here.

Nokia-Health-radar

  1.  Important feature of the software’s ability is data collection. Rapid and precise collection of information, which is then sent instantly to a central server, speeds up what is currently a time-consuming paper-based activity.
  2. Actual aggregation of the data which helps to build a picture of what’s happening and where.
  3. Getting the information back to local practitioners, as it then enables them to take appropriate action. What marks HealthRadar out further is the ability to consume the data either on a mobile device or a PC, so the gathered data is useful to people in the field and those based in medical centres.

The software also features a Dashboard which enables users to quickly access key information including a daily update, a GeoHealth Map which highlights disease intensity alongside local health centres, the ability to compare current patterns against historic ones and statistical graphs.

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Games On Symbian – Scope And Dimensions

I have been doing a random literature survey on the games played on Symbian, their background and other sutleties invloved. We, as users of the Nokia handsets have played several games like Snake or cricket or bounce or FIFA from EA Sports. We know that these have been tremendously successful and have reached millions of users worldwide. All the games listed above use the standard keyboard input and its processing capabilities to entertain people.

This post presents ways to harness the power of the ever-growing Symbian architecture. This article deals with how you can improve the game with just not keypad inputs but also incorporate other hardware features like camera or GPS.

 

The Manhattan mashup story is simple evidence as how the Camera can be used to entertain the public. This case-study involved taking pictures based on a storyboard/subject. Read more here.

This ‘urban’ game proved to be a massive hit when played at New York in September 2006 and was organised by Nokia reseach labs.

Colortracker is another such game that used the camera effectively for a dimension beyond just capturing images.

 

Location

Botfighters was one of the earliest games that were based on the Location services. It used the GPS to search for enemy bots and kill them. However, now Location based games are being developed using A-GPS or other technologies such as WLAN . There are several other games that have successfully used the GPS for gaming – Pac Manhattan.

 

The game Swordfish written in Java ME used A- GPS for location updates and has been wuite popular in Canada and USA. Locomatrix is another such evidence of how quickly GPS ( or Location based ) games are gaining momentum.

 

3D Motion Sensors

This phenomenon has gained huge response ever since Nintendo Wii made it big. They call it Motion sensor gaming. Input is not through keypad navigation keys but moving or tilting the phone itself. There have been a lot of success stories in this case. Global race that comes preinstalled on Nokia 5800 is a popular example, where the user tilts the phone signal left- right controls to the game. This is one of the most exciting avenues, with more and more mobile handsets having incorporated the sensors inside its hardware. Til Tracer or tunnel Run are other examples built on this phenomenon.

This video will hint you, how interesting tilt based games can be.

 

Proximity / Presence

Mobslinger is one of the first games to be developed on proximity/ presence division. Mobslinger runs as a background application on Symbian Series 60 smartphone which periodically scans for other users in the vicinity who are also running the mobslinger application. Once detected, a countdown timer is initiated on both phones which alerts the user by sounding an alarm and vibrating the phone. The user then has to ‘draw’ their mobile and enter the randomly generated number which has appeared on the screen as quickly as possible. The person with the fastest time is the winner and the loser is ‘killed’, which means their application is locked out from game-play for a set period of time.

You can watch the video at this link.

The concept appeared in September in Fifth international conference on Entertainment computing by a group of enthusiasts. However, one has to say that not many games have come out on this scheme.

So, games today have evolved greatly from just keying in controls to the numpad.  There are new dimensions and hence more spaces for game development.

Reference :

Games on Symbian, released by Symbian Press.

 

 

BoosterMedia Brings Online Mobile Games

BoosterMedia has released GamesPlaza.mobi, a casual gaming platform targeting mobile gamers and game developers internationally. GamesPlaza.mobi offers a growing selection of free-to-play mobile games based on Flash technology. The site features localized content in ten different languages. You can find games of different categories too – like Puzzles, Adventure, Arcade, action and many more !

CrazyGems

The awesome part about this is that – many games are FREE ! !

BoosterMedia is also encouraging young Flash lite game developers to send their games to them. If found worthy, they will published at the same site. Sounds Exciting !  You can visit – http://www.gamesplaza.mobi from your handsets!

What NOT To Do While Developing Flash Lite Mobile Games (Repost)

Via Mariam: “Things NOT to do while developing Flash Lite mobile games”, based from an original “50 Ways to Make Us HATE Your Flash Game” article:

1. Add loud and annoying sound effects to your game
2. Don’t add sound control options so we have to listen to your loud and annoying sound effects
3. Make your game ridiculously hard
4. Have a confusing menu system
5. Forget to embed all of your dynamic textfields
6. Don’t optimize your code
7. Add a bunch of cool effects that require lots of processing power and slow down the gaming experience
8. Don’t fix the bugs
9. Have long animations that we can’t skip
10. Don’t give us a clear goal to beat the game
11. Add glow effects to everything
12. Make confusing controls
13. Make the instructions all text with no explanatory pictures/diagrams
14. Make a storyline without graphics to explain it
15. Make it easy for us to cheat
16. Create an ugly color scheme
17. Make the text unreadable
18. Don’t let the buttons look like buttons, we’ll obviously find them very easily
19. Don’t fix the typos
20. Very repetitive game-play
21. Don’t let us pause the game
22. Add pointless features that add a lot of file size
23. Make a really long menu system
24. Make us have to navigate through the entire menu system after we lose the game
25. Camouflage the enemies so we can’t see them until we randomly begin losing health or lose the game
26. Don’t put rollOver functions onto your buttons
27. Make game-play really slow
28. Make loss inevitable
29. Don’t put in a scoring system. We don’t want to know how well we did
30. Make stupid computer AI
31. Make the description of the game really short or really obscure
32. Design a game-play that has been exploited by multiple game designers before
33. Design graphics that have an uneven quality when seen on a mobile screen
34. When run on multiple devices, game scales non uniformly showing objects off screen
35. Don’t worry about rectifying text that looks blurred
36. Advanced levels with really short and easy game-play
37. Don’t let us change game options like sound control and quality during a game-play
38. A bad copy of a popular game
39. A cluttered HUD (Heads-Up Display)
40. Game which are not self explanatory, makes me want to refer to help even after starting playing the game

Of course, these are just guidelines; there may be exceptions to items in the list depending on a particular piece of content

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