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Posts tagged ‘Adobe AIR’

Flash, development and my Playbook

As I had mentioned in my previous post, I wrote an AIR application for the Blackberry Playbook, the newest of the tablets that run Flash. I got a Blackberry Playbook device yesterday and these are my early impressions –

1. Great hardware build and finish. When you have it in your hands, you get a good feeling. It’s not heavy and it feels right.

2. Though launching one year after the launch of iPad, it equals the hardware of the second iPad or iPad2. It has dual cameras, Bluetooth, HDMI connection ports. So the device on the whole is very sophisticated.

3. What the Playbook lacks is the services around it. It does not have a preinstalled E-mail client or a native facebook or twitter application. There are still many categories in the store that are malnutritioned- without apps or content.

However I think the third point will be tackled soon as..

— Android and Java application players will soon be coming to Playbook in a software update, due in summer. This means Android and Java apps just need to be packaged for the Playbook and they will run smoothly on the Playbook. This is an excellent initiative by RIM as it brings a large community of developers with tons of games, apps into the Playbook ecosystem.

— When I was working with Blackberry toolkit in December / January it was primitive versions of the SDK that lacked signing and other features. It was not all that developer friendly.  I remember in late February, SDK 0.9.3 was released which had tools to sign the apps and RIM have been regularly improving the SDKs (which had both good and bad effects). Around last week, RIM released SDK 1.0.1 and image, which is the firmware currently running on the device. Before this it was hard for developers to gauge platform specific features like contextual menu ( Playbook’s menu appears on a swipe from top of the screen), accelerometer or GPS. Hence, developers couldn’t experiment much. Today, with a mature set of tools and simulators and some devices in the market, I expect the apps to grow.

I have also started working on a game for the Blackberry Playbook using Flash, of course.

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AIR 2.6 Launched

Repost from the Adobe Blog,

Adobe is pleased to announce the availability of the Adobe® AIR® 2.6 SDK and AIR® 2.6 desktop runtimes for Windows, Mac and Linux. With AIR 2.6, AIR achieves feature parity for Android and iOS platforms. This new release provides significant improvements for iOS app development as well as updates for Android and desktop app development.”

Here are the updates:

iOS:

  • Updated AIR for iOS support with improved performance. Developers can take advantage of new features in iOS 4 like multitasking, Retina display for higher screen resolutions, and front and back camera support. Developers can now build application that capture audio with the microphone and take advantage of the same graphics hardware method used in AIR for Android using OpenGL ES2 for fast graphics.
  • Packager for iPhone (PFI) is now replaced with and the functionality integrated with AIR Developer Tool (ADT) a comand line tool for compiling application in the AIR SDK. ADT can now be used to package AIR files, native desktop installers, AIR applications for Android and iOS.

Android:

  • Submit apps to be included in the Amazon Appstore for Android when the store launches.  Companies now have an additional distribution option with one of the largest online shopping destinations on the web.
  • USB debugging was added as an additional debugging option to WiFi.

Adobe Unveils First Full Flash Player For Mobile Devices And PCs

Today, Adobe Unveiled First Full Flash Player For Mobile Devices And PCs.  Close to 50 Open Screen Project Participants Support New Browser Runtime for Multiple Platforms.

Adobe unveiled Adobe® Flash® Player 10.1 software for smartphones, smartbooks, netbooks, PCs and other Internet-connected devices, allowing content created using the Adobe Flash Platform to reach users wherever they are. A public developer beta of the browser-based runtime is expected to be available for Windows® Mobile, Palm® webOS and desktop operating systems including Windows, Macintosh and Linux later this year. Public betas for Google® Android™ and Symbian® OS are expected to be available in early 2010. In addition, Adobe and RIM announced a joint collaboration to bring Flash Player to Blackberry® smartphones, and Google joined close to 50 other industry players in the Open Screen Project initiative.

Rest of the post here.

Adobe Flash CS5 sneaks out from FOTB’09

 

There had been varied rumors had been flying around for a few days before this FOTB’09 that that we would be able to check some sneak peaks at this year’s Adobe keynote, and that’s exactly what happened. Richard Galvan and Mark Anders, “Senior” Principle Scientist at Adobe, were back again this year with an update on the Flash platform and a sneak peek on Flash CS5 and the new Flash Mobile features. YES. IT IS FLASH CS5
Marc Anders started off by going over the current platform situation and Flash Player 10 installs continue to impress. New figures due out shortly will put the coverage at over 90%. Mark used some community demos to run through features in the Flash Player 10 and AIR runtimes. (Click any of the images to see the high-rez version)
Flash CS5
Richard Galvan gave us our first sneak peak of “Viper” Flash Professional CS5. The big news for developers is that Flash authoring finally gets integration with FlashBuilder. If you’re using Flash CS5, a new FlashBuilder project can be created from Flash CS5 through a new export dialogue.

 

There had been varied rumors had been flying around for a few days before this FOTB’09 that that we would be able to check some sneak peaks at this year’s Adobe keynote, and that’s exactly what happened. Richard Galvan and Mark Anders, “Senior” Principle Scientist at Adobe, were back again this year with an update on the Flash platform and a sneak peek on Flash CS5 and the new Flash Mobile features. YES, IT IS FLASH CS5.

Marc Anders started off by going over the current platform situation and Flash Player 10 installs continue to impress. New figures due out shortly will put the coverage at over 90%. Mark used some community demos to run through features in the Flash Player 10 and AIR runtimes. 

Flash CS5

Richard Galvan gave first sneak peak of “Viper” Flash Professional CS5. The big news for developers is that Flash authoring finally gets integration with FlashBuilder. If you’re using Flash CS5, a new FlashBuilder project can be created from Flash CS5 through a new export dialogue.

Rest will be followed here in Flashmagazine.

 

Adobe Device Central CS4 Device Profile Update #5 Now Available Online….

image courtesy: www.flashdevices.net

Mark Doherty has written blogpost here on Device Profile Update 5 for Device Central CS4 which is now available for download. This latest device update for Device Central CS4 contains 36 new and some updated profiles bringing the total number of supported devices to 738. 

Here’s an overview of the new profiles:

  • DoCoMo Fujitsu F-08A
  • DoCoMo Fujitsu F-09A
  • DoCoMo NEC N-07A
  • DoCoMo NEC N-08A
  • DoCoMo NEC N-09A
  • DoCoMo Panasonic P-08A
  • DoCoMo Panasonic P-09A
  • DoCoMo Panasonic P-10A
  • DoCoMo Sharp SH-05A
  • DoCoMo Sharp SH-06A
  • DoCoMo Sharp SH-07A
  • HTC Hero for testing flash in the browser
  • KDDI Hitachi HIY01
  • KDDI Kyocera KYX02
  • KDDI Sharp SH002
  • KDDI Toshiba TS002
  • KDDI Toshiba TSY01
  • Nokia 5530 XpressMusic
  • Nokia 5630 XpressMusic
  • Nokia 5800 XpressMusic Flash Lite 3.1
  • Nokia E52
  • Nokia N86 8MP
  • Nokia N97
  • Samsung I8910 HD
  • SoftBank NEC 930N
  • SoftBank Panasonic 931P
  • SoftBank Samsung 931SC
  • SoftBank Sharp 934SH
  • SoftBank Sharp 935SH
  • SoftBank Sharp DM004SH
  • SoftBank Toshiba 832T
  • Sony Ericsson C901 GreenHeart
  • Sony Ericsson C901a GreenHeart
  • Sony Ericsson T707
  • Sony Ericsson T707a
  • Sony Ericsson W518a

 All new device profiles would be available through the Online Device Library in Adobe Device Central CS4.  You can check the complete set of devices here.

The actionscript Conference

Well, here is another event that has been much anticipated in the Flash developer’s circuits. The Actionscript Conference would be held in Singapore on the 14th and 15th of September.

The Actionscript Conference 2009

As you can see, it is a two day event marked by speakers from all over the world and an impressive schedule. The platinum sponsors of this mega- event include Adobe, FDT, iDA Singapore and many more flash related companies.

What is so special about this event is – its a congregation of all the people somehow related to Adobe Flash. There are talks on Flex, Papervision 3D, AIR, Flash mobile, multi – touch.  There is also recruitment BOF, by which recruiting firms can showcase the talent set they are looking for and the attendees , if interested, can approach them.

Attractive right ? Go here to register . Special offers for students exist.

Here is the list of speakers who will grace the occasion with their experience in this platform.

Areas of prime focus would be :

Advanced Flash Player capabilities
Flash Catalyst
Adobe Collaboration Services
Programming Actionscript 3.0
Adobe AIR
Flex 3 and Flex 4 Framework
Creating Mashup with Flash, Flex
Development Methodology
Development Tips and Tricks – Empower and Speed up your Flash development!
Rich Internet Applications
Flash Javascript Integration
Flash Videos
Blaze DS
Integration of Flash, Flex with server-side technologies
Component Designs

Adobe AIR Brings The Web To The Desktop From Tony Patton, TechRepublic

Friends,

Here is About Adobe AIR bringing the web to Desktop—-

One of the points of my article about the qooxdoo (http://cgi.cnet.com.au/link/?id=21972) JavaScript library was the concept of building Web applications with a rich user interface that mimics desktop applications. This is good if you want to mimic the look and feel of a desktop application within a Web page. On the flip side is bringing the Web to the desktop — that is, leveraging Web development skills on the desktop. The Adobe Labs has released the Adobe Integrated Runtime (AIR), which provides this functionality.

Adobe describes AIR as a cross-operating system runtime that allows developers to leverage existing Web development skills to build and deploy rich Web applications to the desktop. It provides support for Flash (http://www.adobe.com/devnet/air/flash/), Flex (http://www.adobe.com/devnet/air/flex/), HTML, JavaScript, and AJAX (http://www.adobe.com/devnet/ajax/).

Getting it

To get started with AIR development, you must install the AIR runtime on your computer. Once it is installed, you may download sample applications to see AIR in action and possibly take a peek under the covers at its code.

There are two downloads relevant to AIR development:

|> Runtime (http://labs.adobe.com/downloads/air.html) provides the runtime environment for running AIR applications. Downloads are available for both Windows and Macintosh operating systems.
|> Software Development Kit (SDK) (http://labs.adobe.com/downloads/airsdk.html) provides everything necessary to build AIR applications. This includes templates, Adobe AIR APIs, and debugger and developer tools. The SDK is available for both Windows and Macintosh platforms. The command line debugger and developer tools require a Java installation (JRE or JDK version 1.4.2 or newer).

Additional downloads are available that allow you to build AIR applications within specific Web development tools:

|> Adobe Flex Builder 3: Includes support for building Flex applications on Adobe AIR from within Flex Builder.
|> Adobe Flex SDK: Allows you to build AIR applications via Flex.
|> Adobe AIR Extension for Dreamweaver CS3 (http://labs.adobe.com/wiki/index.php/AIR:Dreamweaver_CS3_Extension): Adds support for building AIR applications within Dreamweaver CS3.
|> Adobe AIR Extension for Flash CS3 Professional: Allows you to build AIR applications with Flash CS3 Professional.

In addition, a plug-in is available for the Aptana IDE (http://www.aptana.com/air). Once the runtime is installed, you can easily install and run AIR applications, and the SDK allows you to build AIR applications.

AIR HTML application basics

This article focuses on using standard Web technologies HTML and JavaScript to build an AIR application. AIR uses WebKit (http://webkit.org/) to parse, layout, and render HTML and JavaScript content. The AIR API provides host classes and objects for providing desktop applications functionality like reading and writing files and managing windows. In addition, an HTML-based AIR application has the Flash API available to it.

An important distinction of HTML-based AIR applications is that the use of the AIR API is optional. That is, you may choose to use only standard HTML and JavaScript to build an application and run it via the AIR runtime. The runtime includes an HTML renderer and JavaScript interpreter in addition to other features.

There are at least two files in every HTML-based AIR application. The first is an application descriptor file that specifies the application metadata via XML. The second file is a top-level HTML page. Also, AIR provides a JavaScript file (AIRAliases.js) that provides aliases for AIR API classes. More robust applications will include more files like Web pages and JavaScript code.

The AIR SDK includes plenty of sample code for getting a feel for the platform. The following sample code is included in the documentation to get you going with a first, simple application (the ever present Hello World demo).

The following descriptor file provides the details of the application. It references the AIR namespace and assigns a name to the application (Hello World!). The initalWindow element defines application start-up behaviour as an HTML file (Hello.html) is loaded.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<application xmlns="http://ns.adobe.com/air/application/1.0.M5"
appId="sample.HelloWorld" version="0.1">
<name>Hello World </name>
<initialWindow>
<content>Hello.html</content>
<visible>true</visible>
</initialWindow>
</application>

The HTML file (Hello.html) defines the user interface displayed when the application is launched via the AIR runtime. First, the JavaScript aliases file is included to make it easier to work with AIR classes. Next, the JavaScript appLoad function defines what happens when the application loads (function called by onLoad event of page).

The JavaScript function loads data from a simple text file via AJAX and places the text from the file in the HTML element with the ID called replace.

<html><head>
<title>Hello World</title>
<script src="AIRAliases.js"

type="text/javascript"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
function appLoad(){
xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
xmlhttp.open("GET", "request.txt",true);
xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function() {
if (xmlhttp.readyState==4) {
document.getElementById('replace').innerHTML =
xmlhttp.responseText;
} }
xmlhttp.send(null)
}
</script>
</head>
<body onLoad="appLoad();">
<h1>AIR</h1>
<div id="replace">
<p>Placeholder</p>
</div>
</body>
</html>

Once the application is developed, the AIR command line tools can be used to package and distribute it. The AIR Developer Tool (ADT) (http://livedocs.adobe.com/labs/air/1/devappshtml/help.html?content=CommandLineTools_3.html#1028335) creates installation packages, but it requires a digital certificate.

A simple approach

The AIR platform offers a great approach to building desktop applications. I love the fact that it allows me to use existing skills like HTML and JavaScript.

The AIR API offers additional functionality for building client interfaces. The API is JavaScript, so it is easily used within your application. While the qooxdoo approach is the exact opposite, I find the AIR model much more intuitive and easy-to-use. Everything necessary to get started with AIR is freely available online.

Leverage existing skills

A key point of AIR is the ability to port Web development skills to desktop development. Also, using Web technologies like HTML and Flash deliver a familiar interface to users, and developers do not have to spend time learning a new technology such as Microsoft .NET for thick client development. Another strong point is the cross-platform support that is not readily available in other development platforms. If you are interested in desktop applications, take a look at AIR.

The Web browser has evolved into the de facto standard application interface these days, but client applications are still necessary. Have you been faced with developing applications for the desktop? Have you taken a look at AIR? Let me know by posting to the article discussion.

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