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Adobe Whitepaper – Rich Internet applications Across Devices: The Emergence Of Contextual Applications

 “At Adobe, we believe that this is a pivotal time in the history of software development. Cloud-based computing has combined with increased user expectations for interactivity and engaging experiences leading to the rise of rich Internet application (RIA) development. The creation of social networks and platform as a service (PaaS) offerings is enabling applications to grow at unprecedented rates by leveraging existing user networks.  The expanding number and diversity of Internet-connected devices has opened up additional software development platforms for developers and enabled them to create entirely new user interaction models and business opportunities. Together, these three technology trends are converging to deliver major innovations that will have lasting effects on the way web applications are built, delivered, and used.”

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Adobe Unveils AIR on Mobile Devices; Flash Player 10.1 Up Right Here

@ BARCELONA, Spain.  At Mobile World Congress™ 2010 here,  Adobe Systems  today announced advancements to the Adobe® Flash® Platform including the unveiling of Adobe® AIR® on mobile devices, a consistent runtime for standalone applications to come out of the Open Screen Project™, an industry-wide initiative led by Adobe that has grown to close to 70 ecosystem partners. With support for the Android™ platform expected in 2010, AIR provides developers with a feature-rich environment for delivering rich applications outside the mobile browser and across multiple operating systems via mobile marketplaces and app stores. AIR leverages mobile specific features from Flash® Player 10.1, is optimized for high performance on mobile screens and designed to take advantage of native device capabilities for a richer and more immersive user experience.

Adobe also announced that a beta of Flash Player 10.1 was made available to content providers and mobile developers worldwide.

Rest of the post is here……..

And you can view or download a printable version of this article. (PDF: 69k )

Adobe Unveils First Full Flash Player For Mobile Devices And PCs

Today, Adobe Unveiled First Full Flash Player For Mobile Devices And PCs.  Close to 50 Open Screen Project Participants Support New Browser Runtime for Multiple Platforms.

Adobe unveiled Adobe® Flash® Player 10.1 software for smartphones, smartbooks, netbooks, PCs and other Internet-connected devices, allowing content created using the Adobe Flash Platform to reach users wherever they are. A public developer beta of the browser-based runtime is expected to be available for Windows® Mobile, Palm® webOS and desktop operating systems including Windows, Macintosh and Linux later this year. Public betas for Google® Android™ and Symbian® OS are expected to be available in early 2010. In addition, Adobe and RIM announced a joint collaboration to bring Flash Player to Blackberry® smartphones, and Google joined close to 50 other industry players in the Open Screen Project initiative.

Rest of the post here.

Adobe Flash CS5 sneaks out from FOTB’09

 

There had been varied rumors had been flying around for a few days before this FOTB’09 that that we would be able to check some sneak peaks at this year’s Adobe keynote, and that’s exactly what happened. Richard Galvan and Mark Anders, “Senior” Principle Scientist at Adobe, were back again this year with an update on the Flash platform and a sneak peek on Flash CS5 and the new Flash Mobile features. YES. IT IS FLASH CS5
Marc Anders started off by going over the current platform situation and Flash Player 10 installs continue to impress. New figures due out shortly will put the coverage at over 90%. Mark used some community demos to run through features in the Flash Player 10 and AIR runtimes. (Click any of the images to see the high-rez version)
Flash CS5
Richard Galvan gave us our first sneak peak of “Viper” Flash Professional CS5. The big news for developers is that Flash authoring finally gets integration with FlashBuilder. If you’re using Flash CS5, a new FlashBuilder project can be created from Flash CS5 through a new export dialogue.

 

There had been varied rumors had been flying around for a few days before this FOTB’09 that that we would be able to check some sneak peaks at this year’s Adobe keynote, and that’s exactly what happened. Richard Galvan and Mark Anders, “Senior” Principle Scientist at Adobe, were back again this year with an update on the Flash platform and a sneak peek on Flash CS5 and the new Flash Mobile features. YES, IT IS FLASH CS5.

Marc Anders started off by going over the current platform situation and Flash Player 10 installs continue to impress. New figures due out shortly will put the coverage at over 90%. Mark used some community demos to run through features in the Flash Player 10 and AIR runtimes. 

Flash CS5

Richard Galvan gave first sneak peak of “Viper” Flash Professional CS5. The big news for developers is that Flash authoring finally gets integration with FlashBuilder. If you’re using Flash CS5, a new FlashBuilder project can be created from Flash CS5 through a new export dialogue.

Rest will be followed here in Flashmagazine.

 

HTC Hero, The First Android Device To Support Adobe Flash!!!!!!

Though late arrival, never thought that this would be so pretty cool. Now Flash has come alive in it’s first Android based device, the Hero from Open Screen partner HTC!!!!!

It should be a direct sequel to the G1, and has all the features like multi-touch HVGA screen, accelerometer support, GPS, Compass, WIFi, 5 MP camera, Android Webkit Browser, and now with having Adobe Flash makes for even more very rich mobile web user experience.  

Banner_HTC_Hero

Check out the device here!

Adobe has a good a really good press release which explains in detail. They also have made a good video where the Adobe Platform team explains some of the features of the Flash implementation on the HTC Hero device.   According to Mark’s blogpost, it’s possible to view up to 85% of online video through the Flash Player, supports latest Flash Lite 3.1 supports streaming audio capabilities, as well as support for around 80% of Flash content on the web today through the device’s web browser. On this device, double clicking Flash content (games, ads, etc) brings it fullscreen mode, which seems to work very much intuitively: Demo of Flash on the HTC Hero (an Android device).

Icon_Use_Scenes

What version of Flash is this? Well, right now it’s Flash Lite 3.1 according to Adobe.  However, there have been prior public announcements that Flash 10 is coming to Android (by as soon as end of this year), as well as other mention of other SmartPhone platforms like webOS, Windows Mobile, & Symbian for starters down the lane.  Mark says that the HTC Hero has Adobe Distributable Player.  My lateral thought would be that, they (HTC) may upgrade the device at some point later (whether that means Flash Lite 3.x or Flash Player 10 can be anyone’s guess).  Here are few words from Adobe: Serge Jespers, Mark Doherty.  Here are some of the interesting comments from the Peter Elst & Dale Rankine of flashlite community.   With now over one billion devices running Flash, and Android represents a nice (open) platform in which Flash to grow, develop and play.  This new HTC Hero device represents the true mobile (web) experiences possible and I think we’ll see much more devices in the future.

What NOT To Do While Developing Flash Lite Mobile Games (Repost)

Via Mariam: “Things NOT to do while developing Flash Lite mobile games”, based from an original “50 Ways to Make Us HATE Your Flash Game” article:

1. Add loud and annoying sound effects to your game
2. Don’t add sound control options so we have to listen to your loud and annoying sound effects
3. Make your game ridiculously hard
4. Have a confusing menu system
5. Forget to embed all of your dynamic textfields
6. Don’t optimize your code
7. Add a bunch of cool effects that require lots of processing power and slow down the gaming experience
8. Don’t fix the bugs
9. Have long animations that we can’t skip
10. Don’t give us a clear goal to beat the game
11. Add glow effects to everything
12. Make confusing controls
13. Make the instructions all text with no explanatory pictures/diagrams
14. Make a storyline without graphics to explain it
15. Make it easy for us to cheat
16. Create an ugly color scheme
17. Make the text unreadable
18. Don’t let the buttons look like buttons, we’ll obviously find them very easily
19. Don’t fix the typos
20. Very repetitive game-play
21. Don’t let us pause the game
22. Add pointless features that add a lot of file size
23. Make a really long menu system
24. Make us have to navigate through the entire menu system after we lose the game
25. Camouflage the enemies so we can’t see them until we randomly begin losing health or lose the game
26. Don’t put rollOver functions onto your buttons
27. Make game-play really slow
28. Make loss inevitable
29. Don’t put in a scoring system. We don’t want to know how well we did
30. Make stupid computer AI
31. Make the description of the game really short or really obscure
32. Design a game-play that has been exploited by multiple game designers before
33. Design graphics that have an uneven quality when seen on a mobile screen
34. When run on multiple devices, game scales non uniformly showing objects off screen
35. Don’t worry about rectifying text that looks blurred
36. Advanced levels with really short and easy game-play
37. Don’t let us change game options like sound control and quality during a game-play
38. A bad copy of a popular game
39. A cluttered HUD (Heads-Up Display)
40. Game which are not self explanatory, makes me want to refer to help even after starting playing the game

Of course, these are just guidelines; there may be exceptions to items in the list depending on a particular piece of content

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